Power Platform Solution Architecture: Testing considerations for data migration

In this final post on considerations for data migration as part of my wider series on solution architecture for the Power Platform, we’ll discuss areas and considerations for testing executed data migrations and think about rounding off the process to ensure we’re really ready… READ MORE [https://l
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In this final post on considerations for data migration as part of my wider series on solution architecture for the Power Platform, we’ll discuss areas and considerations for testing executed data migrations and think about rounding off the process to ensure we’re really ready for go-live!

Recap…

So friends, if you didn’t already read these posts below, check them out!

Assessing success

So there’s a few aspects to take into account when doing data validation to assess successful data migration. These are…

  • Data quantity – Number of rows expected to be migrated
  • Data quality – The correctness of data values migrated

Consider data ownership

Think about things like data ownership friends and ensuring you’ve migrated this content successfully. Look at things like created and modified columns as well as who owns the data. There may be issues affected by people who have left the organisation, or structure changes and these are fine but they need to be handled to prevent unowned data.

Meet success points

It’s important that when defining the plan for a data migration that we create success points and acceptance criteria that still match and point up to the mission and success points of our project.

Then when it comes to testing, we’ll be able to refer to the success points and assess these to identify an element of whether our migration was successful.

Solution architects role

So there are a few things that the solution architect should own in this space more granularly than just ownership of the end to end process. Here’s some food for thought…

  • Scope planning for migration and validation / testing
  • Bringing in correct stakeholders
  • Ensuring the correct resources are available for the actual migration and development areas
  • Acting as a technical escalation to issues that arise
  • Taking responsibility for seeing the process complete in preparation for a go-live

What’s coming up?

So friends, before finishing up on this part of the series we’ll revisit some more considerations for go-live and then we’ll look at moving into operations, support and iterative CICD solution improvement and development to continue to support the solutions lifecycle.

Written by
Lewis Baybutt
Microsoft Business Applications MVP • Power Platform Consultant • Blogger • Community Contributor • #CommunityRocks • #SharingIsCaring
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